Metavivor Videos

Each year in New Zealand more than 400 women and men will be diagnosed with secondary breast cancer (also known as metastatic or advanced breast cancer). On this page you can view videos of women and men talking about their experiences living with advanced breast cancer.

Embedded thumbnail for What price do you put on life?

What price do you put on life?

A group of New Zealanders with advanced breast cancer make a plea to the Minister of Health to increase funding for medicines now.
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Embedded thumbnail for Cheryle's Story: Don't write me off because I have secondary breast cancer

Cheryle's Story: Don't write me off because I have secondary breast cancer

Cheryle is a mum to a young son and is one of the founders of Shocking Pink, an organisation formed to help young women who are diagnosed with breast cancer. She was initially diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer while breastfeeding and was diagnosed in 2015 with secondary breast cancer in her lungs. Cheryle is passionate about improving New Zealanders access to cancer medicines and says people with secondary breast cancer shouldn’t be “written off”.
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Embedded thumbnail for Maree's Story: Selling up to pay for secondary breast cancer treatment

Maree's Story: Selling up to pay for secondary breast cancer treatment

Maree Shelton is a mum of three daughters who loves to travel. She has secondary breast cancer in her bones.  She describes how being diagnosed with secondary breast cancer felt like being “hit by a train”, but says it’s taught her to be grateful for lots of things. She and her family are in the process of selling their home in order to be able to pay for future treatments Maree may need.
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Embedded thumbnail for Max's Story: A man living with secondary breast cancer

Max's Story: A man living with secondary breast cancer

Max is a father of two and was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 after finding a lump in his nipple. He’s been living with secondary breast cancer since 2013. He’s managed to continue to work throughout treatment and says he wants to see more cancer medicines funded for those who have secondary breast cancer. Max says people with secondary breast cancer are valuable citizens, who work, parent, volunteer and contribute to society. He says they deserve access to the latest treatments. Sadly Max passed away in July 2016 before this video was published.
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Embedded thumbnail for Kirsty's Story: Sharing my life with secondary breast cancer

Kirsty's Story: Sharing my life with secondary breast cancer

Kirsty is a mum of two living with secondary breast cancer.  Kirsty’s had her fair share of ups and downs as she’s been through treatment, but she’s been compelled to share her experience in order to inspire and help others.  Kirsty wants to see the New Zealand government increase funding for cancer medicines so that women with cancer can be around for longer for their children.
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Embedded thumbnail for Moana's Story: A Maori/Pasifika voice on secondary breast cancer

Moana's Story: A Maori/Pasifika voice on secondary breast cancer

Moana is a mum of two with secondary breast cancer. She’s been very involved in various groups advocating for greater access to medicines for breast cancer patients. She’s a firm believer of the need to be “at the table” and says it’s important to hear from Maori and Pasifika women who have worse breast cancer outcomes. Moana says publicly funding more cancer medicines would make a massive difference to many people’s lives.
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Embedded thumbnail for Rochell's Story: Hoping to get on a breast cancer trial

Rochell's Story: Hoping to get on a breast cancer trial

Rochell has a son and loves travelling and water sports. She was initially diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009 and discovered that it had spread to her lungs and bones in 2013. She says the diagnosis of secondary breast cancer filled her with shock and fear, particularly when thinking about what to say to her son. Rochell is sad that so many cancer drugs are not available in New Zealand when they are funded elsewhere. She’s hoping to get on a breast cancer clinical trial in order to access the medicine she needs.
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Embedded thumbnail for Lynda's Story: Conquering life with secondary breast cancer

Lynda's Story: Conquering life with secondary breast cancer

Lynda Ames has been living with secondary breast cancer for nearly eight years. She was first diagnosed in 2008 when she was living in Australia and she chose to stay there because at that time Herceptin wasn’t funded for New Zealanders with secondary breast cancer. She regularly attends 'Boot Camp' three days a week and has done stand-up paddle boarding and biking. She also volunteers at The Ambury Park Centre for Riding Therapy where horses help improve the lives of children, adolescents and adults. Lynda is supported by her husband, family and friends and enjoys travelling when she can. She's passionate about advocating for better access to cancer medicines in New Zealand and says we all need to be more proactive.
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Embedded thumbnail for Kelleigh's Story: Moved to Australia to get on breast cancer clinical trial

Kelleigh's Story: Moved to Australia to get on breast cancer clinical trial

Kelleigh was first diagnosed with breast cancer when breastfeeding. She is a mum to three children and says they keep her going. She was diagnosed with secondary breast cancer in 2012 and her oncologist told her that there were limited treatment options for her in New Zealand. Kelleigh managed to get on a breast cancer clinical trial in Australia and moved there for six months to take part in the trial. She believes New Zealand should fund more cancer medicines.
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Embedded thumbnail for Jo's Story: Hanging onto life with secondary breast cancer

Jo's Story: Hanging onto life with secondary breast cancer

Jo is married with one son and describes herself as a “home engineer”. She was first diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer and now has secondary breast cancer. She says her family, friends and supporters are her rock and have been her strength and motivation. She needs the unfunded medicine Kadcyla and describes herself and others in her position as “desperate people who want to hang onto life.”
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Embedded thumbnail for Anna's Story - A single mum living with secondary breast cancer

Anna's Story - A single mum living with secondary breast cancer

Anna Southern is a single mum with a 15-year-old son. She has been diagnosed with breast cancer four times and now has secondary breast cancer in her lungs and bones. Her son is the most precious thing in her life and she talks about trying to strike a balance between living a normal life and living with cancer. She wants to see more cancer medicines publicly funded in New Zealand.
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